SCHEDULE AT UBUD WRITERS AND READERS FESTIVAL OCT 2017

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OCT  26, 2017, 10:15 – 11:30
NEKA, Jl Raya Sanggingan
NH. DINI : A LIVING LITERARY LEGEND
Leila S.Chudori : Moderator (more…)

Indonesia’s brutal history brought to global attention

Since the fall of Suharto in 1998, authors have tried to broadcast an alternative version the country’s history.

Students demand the resignation of president Suharto in 1998- Paula Bronstein-Liaison

In 1999, as Indonesians were still celebrating the end of 31 years of dictatorial rule by Suharto, their second president, an unemployed philosophy graduate started writing a sprawling novel that blended his fascination for martial arts and horror stories with an acerbic take on his country’s twisted history. (more…)

SCHEDULE AT UBUD WRITERS AND READERS FESTIVAL

Oct 28, 2016, 16.00 – 17.00

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Taman Baca. Jl. Raya Sanggingan

EVOLVING ENGLISH:
English has always been an adaptive lingua franca. As our communications grow ever more global, the English language continues its dynamic evolution. Writers from Indonesia, Singapore, and the USA, take us inside their English. Discussion with: Gill Westaway, Ratih Kumala, Leila S.Chudori, Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan, Mitchell S.Jackson (more…)

OPENING OF “HOME” DISCUSSION AT ASIA BOOK ROOM, CANBERRA

By : Emeritus Professor Virginia M. Hooker

We are here to celebrate Home : a novel by Leila S. Chudori.

It was  published  in Indonesian in 2012 – with its  English translation by John McGlynn,

published by Lontar in 2015. (more…)

LEILA S.CHUDORI’S EVENTS IN ADELAIDE, MELBOURNE AND CANBERRA ( Sept 29 – Oct 11 2016 )

Oct 2nd, 2016 : 9-10 am

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ASILE (Australian Society of Indonesian Language Educators) Conference

Flinders University, Victoria Square, Level 1, Room 1.1 (more…)

HA JIN

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Ha Jin Interview Tebi20151005

“I wrote in English as a form of resistance”
A sudden rainshower during early autumn in Berlin prompted writers and literary figures from various countries to seek shelter under the author’s tent.  They stood close to each other in protection of the cold wind that blew across the tent, drinking and refilling their wine.

Last September, the Berlin International Literaturfestival featured many names normally found in book racks, such as Elif Shafak, Kazuo Ishiguro, Roddy Doyle, Michael Cunningham, Wole Soyinka and Martin Amis, as well as Ha Jin, a literary figure from China, now living in exile in the United States.  All day long, he was surrounded by journalists.

From more than 100 such luminary writers, Ha Jin may be the least among to be aware of his own stardom.   Having produced collections of short stories and seven works of fiction, he has won a number of prestigious awards, among them the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short dan Fiction and the PEN/Hemingway Award.  His novel, War Trash, won the PEN/Faulkner Award, placing him in the same status as American authors Philip Roth and E.L. Doctorow. (more…)

17,000 islands of imagination’: discovering Indonesian literature

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/may/28/why-isnt-more-indonesia-literature-translated-english

It’s the fourth most populous country in the world, yet it is rare to find an English translation of Indonesian literature that doesn’t focus on war or tsunamis. Why, asks Louise Doughty

by:  Louise Doughty’s

I n February last year, I was sitting in Cafe Batavia on Fatahillah Square in Jakarta, talking to an Indonesian friend. We were discussing how any novelist might describe a country to a readership who know nothing about it. We were surrounded by framed photos of Indonesian politicians and Hollywood stars, and the ceiling fans turned overhead. Outside, it was hot and overcast, and students milled around the front of the History Museum, built by the Dutch in 1710 and now housing objects from the founding of Jayakarta in 1527. How could any writer portray such a diverse culture? (more…)

LEILA CHUDORI’S US TRIP FOR “HOME, A NOVEL”, trans by John McGlynn, published by Deep Vellum, US

 

  • Monday, April 11th, Brazos Bookstore, Houston , Texas, 19.00

2421 BISSONNET STREET • HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 (more…)

Indonesia’s lost history

TASH AW

Leila S. Chudori
HOME
Translated by John McGlynn
495pp. Lontar. Paperback, £12.95.
978 602 9144 36 9
US: Deep Vellum. $16.95. 978 1 941920 10 7

Published: 3 February 2016

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A poster commemorating the victims of the 1965 massacre in Indonesia Photograph: Nobodycorp/Internationale Unlimited

 

Early in Leila Chudori’s Home, a seemingly minor exchange takes place between Dimas Suryo, an Indonesian activist and political exile in Paris, and Vivienne Deveraux, a young Frenchwoman. We are in the months following the student protests of May 1968, and Vivienne is raging against the “fucked up” state of her country. “To myself”, Dimas reflects:

“I thought that when it came to the state of a nation, she had no idea what ‘fucked up’ meant. Indonesia was rarely covered in the press, not even in leading news media such as Le Monde and Le Figaro. What the typical French person might know is that Indonesia is a country located somewhere in Southeast Asia not too far from Vietnam . . . . Vivienne and her equally agitated friends . . . wouldn’t have heard the names of Indonesia’s political activists who long predated theirs – such as Sukarno, Hatta, Sjahrir and Tan Malaka.” (more…)